Quechua

Confronting the Giant is the story of Félix, a boy who has just moved to the city from his home in the countryside. Félix is nervous about going to a new school where it seems like he is the only student who speaks Quechua at home, but he finds comfort (and even an adventure!) in his imagination. When he realizes he has a special talent, Félix begins to understand the value of his culture and in turn, helps his classmates recognize the valuable diversity that they all contribute to their community.

Quechua

Casimira Rodríguez was the first indigenous woman to become Minister of Justice in Bolivia. Her inspiring story begins when she leaves her rural community at the age of thirteen to be a household worker for a large family in the city, then surprisingly unfolds into a life-long struggle to improve human rights in Bolivian society, specifically for women who clean houses. It’s a story that transcends cultural boundaries — and provides hope for everyone working to make the world a better place.

Quechua

This story is told through the eyes of Juancito, a young boy who can’t remember how to smile after the death of his beloved grandpa. He wakes up on the first of November to the celebration of Todos Santos (All Saints’ Day or Day of the Dead), a holiday during which friends and family gather to celebrate the life of their loved ones. Through celebrating this holiday and learning about its rituals, Juancito makes peace with the passing of his grandpa.

Quechua

A normal day at the library turns peculiar when the students’ computer games crash, and the children are whisked away on a fast-paced adventure that springs to life from between the pages of a book. Suddenly, they are exploring their country of Bolivia in ways they never had before, discovering the magic of its history, geography, and biodiversity, encountering danger all the while! Will the students make it safely back to the library? How far will their imaginations take them?

This book is trilingual in Spanish, Quechua and English.

Quechua

Where does food come from? How do you make meals from scratch? Why do some foods become special expressions of spiritual values? Iriz goes to see her aunt in the Bolivian countryside for Good Friday and learns about gardens, cooking, and community. Sopa de Pan is a tale that brings us back to our roots in Mother Earth.

This book is trilingual in Spanish, Quechua and English.

Quechua

A little bear named Lucía gets lost and finds children who want to build a playhouse in the forest. She shows them how to use natural and recycled materials for the building. This story supports the construction of ecological houses in Bolivia.

This book is trilingual in Spanish, Quechua and English.

Quechua

Valentina, a domestic worker, her daughter, and their magical stuffed bunny, navigate the consequences of labor exploitation, the importance of standing up for yourself, and the value in doing your best. This book, a tool for discussing labor rights and exploitation, allows readers to develop an understanding of the reality of some domestic workers.

Quechua

Can you figure out what’s wrong with poor, sick Chita? Global climate change is affecting Bolivia’s altiplano, and in this poignant book a girl struggles to understand why her sheep, Chita, is suffering. As her mother explains the environmental reasons behind Chita’s poor health, the girl learns about global warming in Bolivia. By weaving together the experiences of the girl, little Chita, and Mother Earth, you will gain a deeper understanding of climate change and become inspired to think of ways to help our planet.

Quechua

A Bolivian girl named Carmen launches a mission to improve her family’s potato harvest so that her parents can return home from working in the city. With the help of a talkative Liq’i Liq’i bird, Carmen learns the natural signs her ancestors used in the past to predict and manage disruptive weather events affecting the harvest. This charming story affirms the value of rural Bolivian culture, as well as the ingenuity of individuals seeking to improve their lives.

Quechua

What is it like to be an indigenous woman from the countryside attending a university in the big city? Wilma describes the real-life experiences of a young Quechua woman who determines to wear her traditional dress despite her fears of rejection in college. Readers learn about the pride Wilma has for her culture, as well as of her journey from the countryside to university life. The story shows that students from different cultures may be greeted with acceptance by their peers — and do not need to change who they are.

Aymara

Lucy migrates from the small Aymara community of Tocoli to the bustling capital city of La Paz to sell goods in the street. She struggles as a street market vendor — and rejoices when she accomplishes her dream of owning a real store. Lucy’s life as an indigenous storekeeper helps us understand the importance of balancing work, play, and rest in order to live a healthy life. Appropriate for ages 4-12 and beyond, this trilingual story includes a fun search-and-find game within the author’s unique collages.

This book is trilingual in Spanish, Aymara and English.

Aymara

David works hard all day, trying to make enough money to support his sick grandma. One day he is forced to follow a group of bullies into petty crime. The next day he is invited to follow a new friend to a world he thought was only possible in dreams…

This book is trilingual in Spanish, Aymara and English.

Aymara

Learn about the life of a young girl from Bolivia’s Lake Titicaca on a sacred island named Island of the Sun. This story offers a rare glimpse into the Andean worldview and its relationship to Mother Earth, as seen in all aspects of daily life: harvesting potatoes, talking to the ancestors who live in the scared mountains, measuring age according to the agricultural cycle, observing sacred rituals, and more.

This book is trilingual in Spanish, Aymara and English.

Aymara

An Aymara brother and sister are searching for their lost cow near Lake Titicaca in the Bolivian altiplano. Throughout their quest, they encounter fantastical places, people, and things you could never have imagined. This book cleverly explores growing up in the midst of two conflicting forces—an indigenous culture and a globalizing world—and how it shapes the identities and perceptions of Aymara children.

Guarayo

Beside the White River is a glimpse into daily life in Cururú, a Guarayo village in the Bolivian rainforest, one of the smaller and lesser known of Bolivia’s 36 ethnic groups.

The story is written using the collective voice of the village’s children, describing in simple detail their daily activities, food, animals, work, recreation, family and the importance of their land for subsistence agriculture and sustainable wood harvesting. The book includes a section describing the history of Cururú and its place in an increasingly global world, with photos of the village where the author did her research.

 

This book is trilingual in Spanish, Guarayo and English. 

© 2018 by Kids' Books Bolivia 

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Cochabamba, Bolivia

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